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Josse Glover

Darcy's Advowson.
L. 1. An Act to settle Josse Glover, Clerk, Presentee of Dame Grace Darcy, Widow, and George Wilmore, Esquire, Committees of the Body and Lands of Edw. Darcy Esquire, his Majesty's Ward, in the Church of Sutton, in the County of Surrey, and to re-settle the Inheritance of the said Advowson in Edward Darcy, and his Heirs, as appendant to the Manor of Sutton.
L. 2. Act to settle Josse Glover, Clerk Presentee of Dame Grace Darcy, Widow.  - Committed to Mr. Treasurer, Sir Edw. Cooke, Chancellor Duchy, Sir Tho. Wentworth, Sir Fra. Barrington, Mr. Wentworth, Mr. Taylor, Sir Jo. Stradling, Sir Guy Palmes, Mr. Alford, Sir Rob. Cooke, Mr. Noy, Sir Will. Massam, Sir Jo. Walter, Sir Jo. Savyle, Mr. Howard, Mr. Jo. Drake, Sir Edw. Gyles, Sir Tho. Hoby, Sir Wal. Earle, Mr. Smyth, Mr. Craven, Sir Hen. Poole, Mr. Wainsford, Sir Tho. Cheeke, Mr. Brereton, Sir Tho. Barrington, Mr. Solicitor, Sir Miles Fleetwood, Sir James Perrot : - To-morrow, Seven Clock, Court of Wards.
From: 'House of Commons Journal Volume 1: 07 May 1624', Journal of the House of Commons: volume 1: 1547-1629 (1802).
URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=1352. Date accessed: 21 March 2008.
An Act to settle Josse Glover, Clerk, Presentee of Dame Grace Darcy, Widow, and George Wilmore, Esquire, Committees of the Body and Lands of Edward Dercy, Esquire, His Majesty's Ward, in the Church of Sutton, in the County of Surrey; and to re-settle the Inheritance of the said Advowson in the said Edward Darcy, and his Heirs, as appendant to the Manor of Sutton.
From: 'Acts this session: 2 November 1624', Journal of the House of Lords: volume 3: 1620-1628 (1802), pp. 427-430.
URL: http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=30435.
Date accessed: 21 March 2008.
In the church there is a mural monument in memory of Sarah Glover, the first wife of Josse Glover, Rector of Sutton. Sarah died in the year 1628.

Josse Glover married later Elizabeth Harris. Elizabeth was the daughter of the Rev. Nathaniel Harris and granddaughter of the Rev. Richard Harris of Padbury, near Oxford.

Rev. Jose Glover had two children by this second marriage, Priscilla and John.

Rev. Jose Glover was a member of the Massachusetts Bay Company in New England, having subscribed £50. Associated with him, and subscribing the same sum, were his brother-in-law Joseph Owfield, and Richard Davis, whom he styles in his will " my ancient friend."

The declaration of Sports was reissued by Charles I on 18 October 1633, as The King's Majesty's declaration to his subjects concerning lawful sports to be used. It is thought that the new declaration was written by Charles' new Archbishop of Canterbury, William Laud. Charles ordered that any minister who refused to read it would be deprived of position.

Edward Darcey, wrote to the Archbishop of Canterbury. This letter, dated December 12, 1634, declares that Rev. Jose Glover "' refused to publish the Book of Sports," and that he, Edward Darcey, Esq., " did in his desire to have due obedience given to the royall comannde of his sacred Majastie cause the same booke to bee published in the said Church by a neighbo' minister."

It is likely that disgusted by the habits of his Patron and unable to subscribe to the Declaration of sports Jose Glover believed that the Church of England was beyond reform.

It is now pretty well proved that Mr. Glover made his first voyage to America in the spring before this petition was presented to the Archbishop. We know that he was in London on March 13, 1634, when he witnessed the will of Francis Drake of Esher, Surrey, who died March 17.

Rev. Jose Glover was part owner of the " Planter " of London, and it is thought that he sailed in this vessel April 7, 1634. The " Planter " arrived in Boston in June, 1634.

As an adventurer of £50 in the common stock of the Colony, Rev. Jose Glover was entitled to a house lot of half an acre and a farm of two hundred acres. If he applied, and these lands were not granted to him within ten days of his landing, he was at liberty to select land from that not appropriated.

It is probable that Mr. Glover began to build immediately on his land. How long Mr. Glover remained here is not known. He had definitely given up the rectorship of Sutton, for, June 10, 1636, his successor was inducted there.

Mr. Glover returned to England, and went about preaching and speaking in various counties. He collected £50 for a font of type, as he saw what an important help a printing-press would be. With his own money he bought a second-hand press, and, in June, 1638, he entered into a contract with Stephen Day of Cambridge, England, locksmith, to embark with his family on the " John " of London, for New England, there to exercise his trade.

All arrangements being made, the Glover family, consisting of Rev. Jose Glover, his wife, Roger, Elizabeth, and Sarah, children of his first marriage, and John and Priscilla, the children of the second wife, John Stedman his faithful steward, various servants, and the Day party, eight persons, embarked on the " John " and sailed from London late in July, 1638. On the voyage Mr. Glover fell ill, probably of smallpox, and died. He had made his will on the 16th of May of this same year.

The press, together with the services of Stephen Day and his workmen, passed to his widow. On 21 June 1641 she married Henry Dunster, president of Harvard College, who controlled the press until 1654, when he resigned from the presidency and sold it to the college.

An Epitaph

The best epitaph for Jose Glover is provided by his successor.  The new Rector of Sutton wrote in the register:

"Sutton. Henry Wyche, being a non Regent Maister of Arts in the University of Cambridge, was inducted by Thomas Pope into the Rectorie of Sutton, 10 Jun An. Dom. 1636 , after a Resignation made of the same Rectorie by Jose Glover, who was much beloved of the most (if not of All), & his departure much lamented of the most, if not of All. "